farmers market

These resources were kindly provided by the SNAP education staff at the Texas Department of Health & Human Services. We are grateful for their work.

  1. All farmers markets and direct-marketing farmers must be SNAP certified through USDA Food and Nutrition Service (FNS)  before they can accept SNAP at their markets and/or to apply for the SNAP EBT equipment grant.  If a market needs to apply for certification, please have them apply with FNS online at https://fns-prod.azureedge.net/sites/default/files/snap/SNAP-application-educational-notice.pdf or by calling 1-877-823-4369 and requesting a paper application. Once FNS receives a correct and completed application, it can take up to a week for FNS to process the application. FNS will contact the market directly once approved. After approval is received, the market can submit the SNAP EBT Equipment Request Form.
  2. There is an opportunity receive free wireless EBT equipment through September 30, 2021 or as funds are available. Funds are currently still available. See attached flyer for grant information. Applicants must be certified by the FNS to accept SNAP and submit a completed Equipment Request Form.  This form contains an “intent” statement so by signing the form, the market is agreeing to the program requirements; no other letter of intent is needed. If you have any questions about this grant, email EBTRetailerOps@hhsc.state.tx.us.

Here’s the flyer!

SNAP equipment grant flyer for Texas farms & farmers markets.
For more information, email  EBTRetailerOps@hhsc.state.tx.us

From our friends at The Counter, this excellent overview of the history of Black farmers and current actions to dismantle racism in our food system.

Farmers market managers take note and count on us at the Texas Center for Local Food to support your shift to a more diverse customer base. “… the recent movement in the U.S. to promote healthier and more sustainable eating by supporting local farmers’ markets among other things was overwhelmingly white. So though there has been a boom in farmers’ markets in recent years — they grew by 76% from 2008 to 2014, and another 6% since then, according to the USDA — they typically serve affluent white populations and too often have erected barriers that discourage farmers and other vendors of color.

Black farmers’ markets work to “redesign the food system”

Farmer Market Managers Highlights (full report is here)

In 2019, Farmers Market Managers operated 8,140 farmers markets.

The largest number of markets operated during June through September. The month of July was the highest month of operation, followed closely by August, with 71.9 percent and 71.8 percent, respectively. Twenty-one percent of the markets operated year round.

At 52.4 percent, Saturday was the most common day of operation.

Fruits and vegetables composed the most common food category sold at 99.6 percent of markets, followed by Condiments and sauce at 94.1 percent.

The percent of markets that had locally grown labeling totaled nearly 84.7 percent. Gluten free and Grass-fed had 46.1 percent and 46.0 percent, respectively.

Of the 4,076 markets that accepted Federal Nutrition Programs, 78.7 percent accepted Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

Of the 4,352 vendors/producers who accepted Federal Nutrition Programs, 66.7 percent accepted Women, Infants and Children’s (WIC) Farmers Market Nutrition Program (FMNP), followed closely by Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP) at 66.3 percent.

On an average market day, 916 households shopped across markets in the U.S. and spent $14,547 per farmers market.

Farmers Market Managers served as paid employees in 4,321 markets, while in 3,162 they served as volunteers. On average, the paid Farmers Market Mangers earned $18.40 per hour. Managers worked an average of 19.4 hours per week.

There were 31,609 volunteers contributing their time across 5,078 markets.